Darkness Becomes Her: A Review

Darkness Becomes Her by Kelly Keaton

Published by Simon Pulse

Out February 22, 2011

 

 

Ari can’t help feeling lost and alone. With teal eyes and freakish silver hair that can’t be changed or destroyed, Ari has always stood out. And after growing up in foster care, she longs for some understanding of where she came from and who she is.

Her search for answers uncovers a message from her long dead mother: Run. Ari can sense that someone, or something, is getting closer than they should. But it’s impossible to protect herself when she doesn’t know what she’s running from or why she is being pursued.

She knows only one thing: she must return to her birthplace of New 2, the lush rebuilt city of New Orleans. Upon arriving, she discovers that New 2 is very…different. Here, Ari is seemingly normal. But every creature she encounters, no matter how deadly or horrifying, is afraid of her.

Ari won’t stop until she knows why. But some truths are too haunting, too terrifying, to ever be revealed.

A place filled with different creatures that are all afraid of a girl that is a bit different herself sounds pretty awesome. In New 2, Ari discovers that there are many freaks of nature, as she often describes herself, roaming around like: vampires, witches, half vampire/half witches, shapeshifters and…Athena. That’s right, the Athena many of us are familiar with from Greek Myths. You might be thinking to yourself that it looks like Kelly Keaton took on a lot for her first novel in this series and I would say you are exactly right.

Keaton creates a world where many different creatures exist without the fear of becoming a lab experiment, due to the Novem-the nine families that perserve their city. With all the preternaturals in the story, at times things can get a bit conviluted and frankly, some of it could have been cut out.

Ari goes to New 2 to learn about her mother and father. Pretty early on in Ari and Sebastian’s (half vampire/half witch) relationship, Ari tell’s Sebastian about her mother, almost without hesitating. Realistically, something that traumatic happening to Ari and with barely knowing Sebastian, there would at least be some hesitation or maybe withholding of information. Little things like this continunally occur throughout the novel making both the characters and the dialogue unbelievable.

The novel wasn’t entirely bad as it did have some decent parts. For instance, Ari’s interal dialogue can be humorous at times and what Sebastian’s character will possibly become is intriguing.

Overall: Unsatisfying. There are decent ideas here but it was poorly executed. Perhaps the future books in the series can pull it all together. A caution to young readers or those sensitive to cursing: there is a lot of it.

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